Average Position Is No More

What does retiring average position mean & how should we prepare for this change?

Google has announced that they are removing Average Position from the Google Ads platform and this change is due to take place later this year. If you are wondering why this change is taking place and what it means for you, then we are here to help.

Why has Google made this change?

Google has made a lot of changes to the Google Ads interface over the last 18 months and the removal of the Average Position metric is the next notable update. It has become less clear what that position actually equated to on a page, which has led to this metric being misinterpreted. The word ‘Position’ refers to a relative position compared to other advertisers and has little to do with the actual position on a page.

New metrics, more clarity!

There is going to be a shift towards top position metrics as they will provide more clarity and data that can be used to shape current and future strategies. The metrics that can be used to better understand how often your ad shows at the top of the page are Impression (Absolute Top) % and Impression (Top) %. The other two metrics are Search Absolute Top Impression Share and Search (Top) Impression Share. These can be used to identify areas for improvement and opportunities to get more impressions at the top of the page.

Impression (Absolute Top) %: The percentage of received impressions that were at the very top of the page.

Impression (Top): The percentage of received impressions that were above the organic results.

Search Absolute Top Impression Share: The number of impressions your ad has received in the absolute position divided by the estimated number of impressions you were eligible to receive.

Search Top Impression Share: The number of impressions your ad receives in a position above the organic search results compared to the estimated number of impressions you were eligible to receive.

Example of Average Position
Example of Average Position

 

These metrics can be added by adding them as columns in the Ads & Extensions in the Google Ads Interface.

The use of these metrics when it comes to decision making within an account and the reporting process is likely to make it easier for users to gain an understanding of how often their ads are showing at the top of the page and the areas that require improvement.

Potential impact?

It is thought that this change could also be Google’s way of encouraging businesses to bid higher as they compete with others in the industry for the top positions on a page. This could lead to higher average cost-per-click, so it is important to keep this in mind when adjusting bids.

Unsure what removing Average Position will mean for your Paid Search campaigns? Don’t worry; we are here to make this easier for you! Contact Us today to find out more about how we can help.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on google
Google+
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn